wetheurban:

ART: Skittles by Josh Kline

Josh Kline presents Skittles, an industrial refrigerator containing smoothies produced by the artist using unconventional and poetic combinations of ingredients including kale chips, squid ink, sneakers, phone bills, and pepper spray.

Each smoothie stands as a portrait of a different contemporary lifestyle. When grouped together, they evoke a landscape of aspiration, taste, and – at times – deprivation in a metropolis like New York City.

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(via theboywiththebeautifulhair)


saatchiart:

Mark Horst
United States


yugichrist:

retronauthq:

WWI: Pigeon being released from tank 
Source

During WWI, when tanks were cornered into hopeless situations, in a desperate last ditch effort they would sometimes release a pigeon. All tanks were outfitted with normally one, sometimes two pigeons, of various breeds, specifically for this purpose. The pigeon would use unfathomable power to destroy absolutely everything around it, but often would also destroy the tank it was released from and kill its occupants in the process, which is why tank operators were so hesitant to resort to releasing their pigeons. Over 10,000 people were killed during WWI from pigeon related combat alone.
The most infamous pigeon related incident during the war was at the Third Battle of Ypres in 1917, when British colonel Reginald William Edwards released an extremely powerful Szegediner Highflier pigeon from the Mark IV tank he was operating, which had become immobilized in mud and surrounded by several German Leichter Kampfwagen I tanks. The Highfligher immediately flew up to an altitude surpassing Earth’s mesosphere, then plunged back down, diving into one of the LK I tanks and creating a massive shockwave that killed over 1,500 and injured tens of thousands of soldiers and civilians alike.

yugichrist:

retronauthq:

WWI: Pigeon being released from tank 


Source

During WWI, when tanks were cornered into hopeless situations, in a desperate last ditch effort they would sometimes release a pigeon. All tanks were outfitted with normally one, sometimes two pigeons, of various breeds, specifically for this purpose. The pigeon would use unfathomable power to destroy absolutely everything around it, but often would also destroy the tank it was released from and kill its occupants in the process, which is why tank operators were so hesitant to resort to releasing their pigeons. Over 10,000 people were killed during WWI from pigeon related combat alone.

The most infamous pigeon related incident during the war was at the Third Battle of Ypres in 1917, when British colonel Reginald William Edwards released an extremely powerful Szegediner Highflier pigeon from the Mark IV tank he was operating, which had become immobilized in mud and surrounded by several German Leichter Kampfwagen I tanks. The Highfligher immediately flew up to an altitude surpassing Earth’s mesosphere, then plunged back down, diving into one of the LK I tanks and creating a massive shockwave that killed over 1,500 and injured tens of thousands of soldiers and civilians alike.

(via lifesgrandparade)


tierradentro:

A fight at the Ukrainian Parliament transformed into a Caravaggio-like painting… that’s why we love the internet. :-D
(Photo credit: Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters)

tierradentro:

A fight at the Ukrainian Parliament transformed into a Caravaggio-like painting… that’s why we love the internet. :-D

(Photo credit: Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters)

(via close-to-the-knives)



foxmouth:

Travel Photography, 2014 | by Pat Perry

(via polerstuff)


absquatulate:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

WHERE THE FUCK IS THIS MOVIE

absquatulate:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

WHERE THE FUCK IS THIS MOVIE

(via b-rar)


likeafieldmouse:

Miguel Laino

1. Black Portrait of a Poet

2. Fugaz Realidad, K-holes and Fragmented Reality and Right Back to Right Now

3. The Long Walk Ahead While Looking Back in Disbelief

4. No There, No Then…

5. Patient

6. Designated Guardian

7. The Observer Effect

8. Salvado 

9. Stepping Across the Edge of the In-between

10. Portrait


Volkswagen: preferred vehicle of suicide bombers

Volkswagen: preferred vehicle of suicide bombers

(Source: 4gifs)


(Source: zerostatereflex)




capsep:

Louis Wain’s cats as he progressed into schizophrenia.

Louis Wain could have seriously been a Batman villain. A successful English artist he began to paint exclusively cats after extensively painting his dying wife’s cat. He then made a living on children’s books and illustrations of anthropomorphic cats often parodying everyday life. After about 30 years he began to suffer from schizophrenia, theorized to be precipitated by toxoplasmosis, a parasitic infection that can be contracted from cats. After he became too paranoid and violent for his sisters to care for, he was institutionalized at the relatively pleasant Napsbury Hospital , with a garden and colony of cats. Over the next 15 years, he continued to paint cats in increasingly psychedelic depictions.

image

(Source: timblur, via workman)



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